Military

Carnegie Mellon, Pitt to Create Autonomous Robotic Trauma Care System

May 22, 2019       Carnegie Mellon University PITTSBURGH—The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Carnegie Mellon University each have been awarded four-year contracts totaling more than $7.2 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an autonomous trauma care system that fits in a backpack and can treat and stabilize soldiers injured in remote locations. The goal of TRAuma Care in a Rucksack: TRACIR is to develop artificial intelligence (AI) technologies enabling medical interventions that extend the “golden hour” for treating combat casualties and ensure an injured person’s survival for long medical evacuations. A multidisciplinary team of Pitt researchers and clinicians from emergency medicine, surgery, critical care and pulmonary fields will provide real-world tra...

Exoskeletons Strengthen in Uses Beyond Healthcare

Source: Sarcos Robotics Exoskeletons are perhaps best known for improving mobility among paraplegics. However, they are developing and are becoming increasingly useful for jobs as varied as farmers, welders, and soldiers. Lightening physical workloads has become an issue in labor relations, especially in Northwestern Europe. Ergonomics and shorter working hours play their part, but exoskeletons have become an important alternative. Mainly used to restore or improve people’s ability to walk or to lift normal objects, exoskeletons are finding broader applications in industries such as construction and warehousing. Exoskeletons have also become much more sophisticated. Initially, they were no more than high-precision braces, but advances in robotics, materials science, and artificial intellig...

How New Designs are Making Great Strides in Exoskeletons

Learn how advances in components are driving better designs for new exoskeleton development. The concept of exoskeletons that can either augment a human’s strength for lifting heavy objects, or ones that help people injured in accidents to walk again, has been around for decades. But until recently, the high costs, heavy weight and other obstacles have prevented the technology from taking off. New advances in design, power, weight, and materials are enabling growth in the exoskeleton market. ABI Research recently predicted that global revenue for exoskeletons will reach $5.8 billion in 2028, with more than 300,000 units sold. An aging population, coupled with large industries developing injury protection systems for their workers, are among the growth drivers for exoskeletons. In this webc...

Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality Are the Training Tools of the Future

Training employees on complex processes in manufacturing and assembly is a good use case for augmented reality and virtual reality. Here are some innovative AR/VR providers. Source: iStock.com Virtual reality and augmented reality are not just for games. At the offices of Epsilon Systems Solutions Inc., in an ordinary office park in Norfolk, Va., a human being can put on virtual reality goggles with a microphone and talk to a trainer in a different time zone and be trained on maintenance procedures inside the torpedo room of a U.S. attack submarine. To the user at Epsilon Systems in Virginia, the look, feel and experience is identical to being on the actual submarine, with identica… Please create an account to continue reading Thank you for enjoying Robotics Business Review. You̵...

Iranian Robotics Advances, With or Without Sanctions

Source: ClipArt.com In the U.S., most of the news coverage of Iran focuses on economic sanctions and renewed geopolitical tensions. The current Middle Eastern republic, previously known as Persia, is only about 40 years old and commonly evokes images of natural resources, religion, and revolution — but not usually another “r” word, robotics. At the same time, Iranian robotics has made some advances. According to the CIA’s World Factbook, Iran boasts a population about 82 million, with a median age of 28.8 and a gross domestic product of more than $1.3 trillion. Let’s see how recent Iranian robotics developments add to our understanding of the country. Iranian robotics is unconventional Part of Iran’s robotics journey involves robots that are unique to Iran. In 2016, Ikap Robotics won a sta...

Spectral X-Ray Scanner Gives Detailed New View Inside The Body

July 12th, 2018 Editors Diagnostics, Radiology An amazing new X-ray scanner has been tried for the first time on a human, producing 3D color images with incredible detail. The spectral (multi-energy) scanner was developed for clinical uses by researchers at Universities of Canterbury and Otago, both in New Zealand, and it relies on a detector created originally for CERN, the large European particle accelerator laboratory, to help find the Higgs boson. The detector is unique because it measures the X-ray energy delivered to it and counts photons at the same time, resulting in thousands of times more data than CT or MRI machines. This, in turn, provides an ability to quantitatively assess the images, looking for specific types of tissues, contrast agents, and even drugs and nanoparticles. Th...

EchoNous Vein Portable Ultrasound for Peripheral IV Placements

July 12th, 2018 Editors Anesthesiology, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Medicine, Pediatrics, Radiology EchoNous, a Seattle-based firm, landed FDA clearance for its EchoNous Vein ultrasound for peripheral IV catheter delivery. It can visualize veins up to five centimeters deep and can be used on both children and adults. The transducer probe connects to a Samsung tablet, which serves as the display and control device, since the probe only has two buttons on its body. The EchoNous Vein is portable and compact, and tuned to image vasculature, allowing clinicians to quickly place an IV with fewer failures and re-insertions. “Time is critical, especially when patients need an infusion or antibiotic treatment, and finding the right vein can be challenging. We designed the EchoNous Vein to pr...

Scientists Use Organ on Chip to Grow New Kidney Cells

July 12th, 2018 Editors Genetics, Medicine, Pathology Scientists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have come up with a way of growing podocytes, kidney cells that filter out blood, from induced pluripotent stem cells inside a special chamber that replicates the glomerulus of a kidney. These cells, provided an environment similar to their natural one, have shown remarkable identity to their all-real cousins in their transcriptomic and protein expression abilitities. According to Wyss, they “match those of mature podocytes”. Because the cells grown using Wyss’ approach are effectively the same as naturally produced ones, researchers now have an ability to perform all kinds of studies that were previously nearly impossible. Diseases can be induced to study the mechanisms, potential drug compounds t...

Medtronic’s HVAD Heart Pump FDA Approved for Less Invasive Implantation

July 12th, 2018 Editors Cardiac Surgery, Cardiology Medtronic’s HVAD System, a left ventricular assist device, can now be implanted via a thoracotomy, a less invasive procedure than a median sternotomy. Moreover, a thoracotomy means that future procedures that may require access through the chest can still be performed in what are already risky patients. The HVAD System is indicated for those with advanced, refractory heart failure, both as a bridge to a heart transplant and as a final therapy if a transplant is not an option. Some details about what led to this news: FDA approval for HVAD implantation via thoracotomy is based on data from the LATERAL prospective clinical trial, in which 144 patients, with end-stage heart failure who were eligible for heart transplant, were enrolled at 26 ...

Medmo Offers New “Name-Your-Price” Platform for Medical Imaging

New medical technology solution lets patients set their own price for radiology imaging tests, like MRIs and CAT scans Medmo (https://www.medmo.com) is a new, rapidly-growing healthcare start-up that enables patients to obtain medical imaging tests – such as MRIs, CT scans (CAT scans), PET scans, and more  – at the exact price they can afford, with no surprise fees or bills. Patients simply indicate the type of scan they need, and Medmo connects them with a nearby, accredited imaging center that can work with their budget. “The ‘name your price’ concept has worked well in the travel industry, and the medical imaging business is similar. The standard prices are high, but imaging centers often have last-minute openings on their schedule that they’re willing to offer at a significant discount...

FDA approves freeze-dried blood plasma for use by U.S. troops

The military is getting a leg-up on ordinary civilians when it comes to wound treatment — courtesy of a decision by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve an experimental freeze-dried blood plasma for use by U.S. troops, even though it’s not approved for wider use by the population at large. The freeze-dried plasma could be a lifesaver in war zones, where regular injuries are still unfortunately common. Plasma is the component in blood which causes clotting, thereby stopping the bleeding. The advantage of the freeze-dried plasma is that it doesn’t need to be refrigerated, and can also be delivered more quickly, since it doesn’t have to be thawed out as with regular frozen blood plasma. Whether or not the freeze-dried plasma — which is manufactured by a company in France — would ...

G-Med, An International Social Platform for Physicians: Interview with CEO Ilan Ben Ezri

Scientific researchers commonly collaborate beyond their specific institutions, and sometimes even their field, with peers around the world studying related subjects and solving adjacent challenges. Physicians, on the other hand, are typically limited to their immediate practice or physician colleagues for input on complex cases or insights into changing clinical trends. G-Med, an international, social media platform exclusively for physicians, is seeking to facilitate similar opportunities for crowdsourcing and collaboration that scientists already experience. Today, G-Med has built a network of over 120,000 doctors from 50 different countries representing 60 different specializations. Members of the G-Med community have the ability to receive insight from peers around the world on cases ...

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