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Video Friday: Watch Robots Make a Crepe and Twist the Perfect Pretzel

[unable to retrieve full-text content]IEEE SR

The Best DNA Tests You Can Buy

Despite the fact that tons of competitors have sprung up in recent years, 23AndMe still makes the best DNA test on the market. It’s the quickest, it’s very comprehensive, and the way the company presents your genetic data is simple and easy to digest. However, depending on what kind of information you’re looking for, there are other, more specialized DNA tests that might be better suited for you. Whether it’s ancestry, fitness, disease risk, or something else entirely, there’s likely a DNA kit that’ll uncover that data. With the rising popularity of these tests, we decided to take a closer look and see which ones are worth the investment. To do this, we secured a mail-in kit from as many DNA testing services as we could find, then shipped them a spit tube full of our precious genetic code ...

Soft Exosuit Makes Walking and Running Easier Than Ever

[unable to retrieve full-text content]IEEE SR

Amazing app promises a full fitness checkup from a 30-second selfie

Anura Whether it’s playing a game, reading the news, checking our social media profile, snapping a quick photo or, you know, actually calling someone, over the decade-and-a-bit that smartphones have existed, they’ve fast become a one-stop-shop for just about everything we do on a daily basis. Could they soon become a comprehensive health monitoring system as well? Researchers at the University of Toronto believe so. And they’ve developed the software to prove it. Called Anura, it’s a groundbreaking mobile app which provides users with a host of “health indexes” gleaned from nothing more invasive than a 30-second selfie. Your next question is likely some variation of, “but just how much information is it possible to gather from a selfie?” The answer: Probably a lot more than you think. “My ...

How Robotics Teams Prepared for DARPA’s SubT Challenge

[unable to retrieve full-text content]IEEE SR

DARPA Subterranean Challenge: Tunnel Circuit Preview

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This origami-inspired kayak is so small that you could fit 3 in your trunk

Previous Next Back in 2012, Oru Kayaks became one of the first crowdfunding sensations in the outdoor space when it introduced its original folding kayak. The unique, origami-inspired design of the boat allowed it to transform into a lightweight, easy to paddle kayak that could then fold up and be stored in a box when not in use. The success of that model allowed Oru to introduce several others in the years that followed, creating a line of products that appeals to a wide range of paddlers. Now, the company is hoping to catch lightning in a bottle once again by introducing its lightest, most accessible, and most affordable kayak yet. The Inlet, which launched on Kickstarter today, promises to bring a slew of nice refinements to the Oru formula. For instance, the boat weighs just 20 pounds,...

Robot Made of Clay Can Sculpt Its Own Body

[unable to retrieve full-text content]IEEE SR

Video Friday: This Wearable Robotic Tail Will Improve Your Balance

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Disney Research Makes Dynamic Robots Less Wiggly, More Lifelike

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Specialized AI Chips Hold Both Promise and Peril for Developers

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These ski goggles deliver music using your face bones instead of earbuds

One of the most dangerous parts of skiing or snowboarding while listening to your favorite tunes is the fact that you have absolutely no chance of hearing the outside world when you’re flying down the slopes. It’s important to be able to hear other people around you, lest you be pounded into the snow by a careening teen. That’s where Bone Tech’s new IceBrkr goggles come in handy. Aesthetically, they look like a fairly standard pair of ski googles, but they’ve got a pretty cool trick up their sleeve: Bone conduction tech, which allows them to use the vibration of your skull to play your favorite songs. To do it, the googles — claimed by the company to be the first-ever ski goggles with bone conduction integration — use patented bendable arms that provide constant contact between audio trans...